Dating fender bassman silverface

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The output was 50 watts at 8 ohm into a single 12 inch speaker, with a "Tone Ring" baffle in the speaker cabinet.

In early 1961, model 6G6-A was introduced with a solid state rectifier replacing the GZ34, and two 12 inch speakers with a conventional baffle in a slightly larger cabinet (wired in parallel) with a 4 ohm output.

with a front panel that had a rectangular grill cloth with rounded corners and looked much like a television of that era.

In 1953 the cabinet designs were changed to the so-called "Wide Panel" design, with a 5 inch wide tweed covered panel above and below a wider swath of grill cloth.

5B6 Bassman amplifiers had two 6SC7 or 6SL7GT pre-amp tubes, two 5881 power tubes and a single 5U4G rectifier tube.

It was designed to generate 26 watts at an 8 ohm impedance load, and offered a cathode-based bias.

Many professional music industry analysts have heralded the 1950s Fender 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest guitar amp ever.

The first 4x10 Bassman amplifiers started with a batch of prototypes in November and December 1954, model 5D6.

The lowest serial number known to still exist is 0013 (Frank Roy), 0035 (Albert Talley), 0075 (Jim Cornett), 0077 (Perry Tate), 0089 (Mark Grandfield), 0701, 0745 (Walter Horton), 0769 (Hayes Kolb), 0780 (sold on e Bay Nov 2006), 0783, and 0785 (Hayes Kolb) are among those still known to exist.

Fender began making other models with tweed covering, a similar open backed cabinet with a rectangular grill cloth and a narrow (just over an inch wide) tweed covered panel at the top and bottom.

Later on, production was moved to Ensenada, Baja California, and the model name was altered to "59 Bassman LTD".

The LTD came equipped with the original 5AR4 rectifier tube, and four Jensen P10R reissue alnico speakers, which was period correct for the original amp.

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