Dating antique beer bottles serengeti sun dating

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We have put together this website to promote our online community along with the hobby of digging and collecting antique bottles and pots, we hope to share some information explaining what our hobby is all about and we have included a gallery of photos to give you an introduction to what we are all about and some details about our online forum.

Unfortunately I can't tell from the bottom; however, I do know that they were advertising these in the mid to late 1930's in my area so it is most likely from that era. ndnr glass coke but they were asking 10.00 for it, which was probably a deal but 10.00 seemed like alot.

This is very frequently the case, especially with soda, mineral water, beer and other bottles of the 1880-1930 period, in which the initial(s) of the “end user” (such as the bottler, brewery, drug manufacturer, or other firm for which the bottle was made) appear embossed on the base. initials of early glass companies) may vary slightly in appearance and punctuation from one bottle to another. These marks usually served as some type of mold identification, indicating a particular mold used by a glass factory.

For instance, they sometimes occur with or without periods after each letter. If a number of identical molds were produced for making a certain type of bottle, they would often be serially numbered (such as 1 to 12).

However, the general style, shape and glass color of a container can give strong clues to approximate age. That book is the best reference work ever published on glass manufacturers’ marks on bottles, but it does contain many errors which have been discovered over the last several decades since it’s publication. Fletcher, Norman “Ted” Oppelt, Dick Cole, Harvey Teal, Dean Six, Tom Neff, Albert Morin, John P. (Eventually, I may add a page on this site with lists of books by some of the above-named persons which I found to be of most value.

Other sources of information I have used (including reference books, magazine articles, websites, and in some cases, email or voice communications) would include: Helen Mc Kearin, Rhea Mansfield Knittle, Stephen Van Rennselaer, Harry Hall White, Alice Creswick, Dick Roller, William S. In the meantime, you might try an internet search for more information on these names……there is a wealth of information out there, with many books in libraries and/or online pertaining to glass history, antique glass collecting, glass container manufacturing, and related fields).

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